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5 Lesbians Eating a Quiche

Stage Q is proud to present 5 Lesbians Eating a Quiche written by Evan Linder and Andrew Hobgood at the Bartell Theatre, 113 E. Mifflin Street in downtown Madison, from March 28th to April 12th, 2014.  Directed by Jan Levine Thal, 5 Lesbians Eating a Quiche is a comedy with a twist and a “frolicsome little play that ventures into heady excesses of absurdism” (NY Times).

 

A dark comedy set in 1956 amid the threat of nuclear war, this play harpoons many of the mid-century myths and assumptions that pushed lesbians into the closet or into the kitchen to bake quiche.

 

Performances run from March 28 thru April 12 and tickets are available at www.stageq.com and are $15 for Thursday, $20 Friday and Saturday and $10 for Sunday.

 

Free health talk focuses on prescription drugs

This month, Jim Rybacki, director of pharmacy for Dean & St. Mary's starts a series of free events focused on prescription drugs.

The first in the series will kick off on Feb. 27. It will be an opportunity to learn about the 12 key medicines you and your family should know.

Rybacki said the health education session will teach attendees about aspirin and cholesterol-lowering medicines that you can get people on a path toward a healthy heart.

Rybacki is the author of "The Essential Guide to Prescription Drugs, Medicines and Your Family," national treatment guidelines and more than 30 books and eBooks. Rybacki has been active with the American Heart Association Patient and Professional Education committees and sits on the National Advisory Council for Mended Hearts International.

The free informational series is offered by Dean Clinic Pharmacy.

Dance school offers new ballet class for all abilities

A Madison dance school offers a ballet class that is the first of its kind in the area.

Jo Matzner began teaching sitting ballet to children and adults at the Kehl School of Dance on Verona Road in January. 

The class was designed to allow anyone with mobility or health concerns to learn ballet and exercise. It is open to people who use assitive devices, but it is not limited. Students should have upper body mobility.

Seven-year-old Lauren Tierney was one of the newest students over the weekend. Tierney has cerebral palsy and uses crutches to move around, but on Sunday she was excited to get her first pair of ballet slippers.

She said she wanted to take class after a personal care worker showed her some ballet moves.

"In Wisconsin it's a really long winter, so having a range of activities and things that can be done in the winter is great," Lauren's father Adam Tierney said. He said Lauren had built up excitement before the first class.

Winter season ripe for snowshoeing at area parks

Winter season ripe for snowshoeing at area parks

If Madison area residents are looking for a cabin fever cure, area parks offer various trails for a fun snow activity.

Madison Parks spokeswoman Laura Whitmore said snowshoeing is a great way to get outdoors in Wisconsin's winter months and experience the Madison area parks. 

In addition to Edna Taylor Conservation Park, snowshoe trails are offered at Cherokee Marsh Mendota and North units, Elvehjem Park, Garner Park, Heritage Prairie, Heritage Sanctuary, Hoyt Park, Knollwood Conservation Park, Mineral Point Park, Prairie Ridge Conservation Park, Sandburg Woods, Walnut Grove Park and Warner Park. 

More information is available online at cityofmadison.com/parks/snowshoeing.

Watch News 3's Mary Jo Ola tackle the winter activity at Edna Taylor Conservation Park:

Madison Utilities: Make sure your pipes are protected

Madison Utilities: Make sure your pipes are protected

Madison Water Utility officials are hoping a few quick tips will help residents avoid costly -- and dangerous pipe bursting accidents during the extreme cold.

According to a release, MWU has initiated emergency water shut-offs at six unoccupied homes because of burst pipes. But, officials say there are a few simple steps customers can take.

  • If you have heating tape around pipes, make sure it's plugged in.
  • Double-check that outdoor spigots are off and all hoses are disconnected.
  • Insulate pipes in unheated areas.
  • Leave some heat on in unused areas of the home.
  • Keep the thermostat on at least 55 degrees if you're going out of town
  • If leaving town for extended period of time, have pipes winterized.

According to the release, all family members and household residents should know where the main water shut-off valve in the home is in case of a burst pipe.

Foundation's maze fundraiser helps families pay heat bill

Foundation's maze fundraiser helps families pay heat bill

Keep Wisconsin Warm/Cool Fund hosted its fourth consecutive A-Maizing Charity Corn Maze this fall to help keep the heat and power on in households all over the state.

 As a nonprofit statewide organization, KWWCF has worked since 1996 to help struggling households meet basic needs like energy costs. The charity corn maze has turned into an annual event that helps raise community awareness, and to tame the energy crisis affecting many Wisconsin households.

Scope of hunger in Dane County is getting worse

Scope of hunger in Dane County is getting worse

Vincent Washington took his place in line outside of the Bread of Life Food Pantry. It's certainly not his first time at St. Paul's. He and his wife used to volunteer there, until the temp jobs ran out, along with the food in his kitchen.

Now unemployed, Washington said coming to the pantry once a month is about survival.

"Without it, what are you going to do? Go out there and steal and rob, and then where would you be?" Washington said.

Teriann Strassi will also have Thanksgiving dinner thanks to Bread of Life. She started coming in 2010 after her job was shipped overseas and her unemployment benefits ran out.

A mother of three, Strassi is working toward her paralegal degree. Since her husband works full time, the family doesn't qualify for food stamps or other government help when it comes to food.

"There have been plenty of tears. Plenty of days when I feel like I can't make it," Strassi said. "Tomorrow's always better."